An April Shower of Links

An April Shower of Links

M/M specific

“Kill the bitch” – a couple thoughts on women in m/m fiction

Alexsandr Voinov on the raw deal women characters can get in m/m fiction.

Apparently the worst thing a woman can commit in m/m fiction is to love one of the main characters and have any claims over him.


The purity of fear, prejudice, and intolerance (the m/m rainbow has only one colour: gay)

More from Alexsandr Voinov on arguments about “purity” of m/m fiction.

Only gay men in m/m are stripped of female friends and family. The received wisdom is that “readers don’t want to read about it”. I’ve seen people loathe Jean, but I’d say Katya in Special Forces gets even more hate (this number is subjective).


Women in M/M PSA

Heidi Belleau’s response to Alexsandr’s post above.

My books have women in them. Capable women, smart women, lost women, emotional women, kind women, villainous women, mothers and wives and exes and sisters and cousins and girlfriends and great great great (great great great, etc.) grandmothers. Sometimes they have sex. Sometimes I even write in full glorious detail about their sex organs.


Fan Fiction, Slash and M/M Romance

A round table discussion post on Dear Author generating a lot of comments about the influence of slash fiction on M/M romance.

Sunita: For me, the second way that fan fiction affects m/m as a genre is less ethically problematic but perhaps just as important in the growth and maturation of the genre. I’m talking about the adoption and immense popularity of certain types of stories, such as hurt/comfort, Gay4U, Out4U. Fan fiction writing experience is very helpful in developing certain aspects of a writer’s craft. Writers are often very good at character interaction. Good m/m romances have interesting characters, and the romantic relationships are carefully and compellingly written. But not all authors are as good at other components of a story that are necessary when moving into the world of original fiction.


Five M/M Genre Peeves

S.L. Armstrong talks about the 5 things that annoy her in m/m romances

Just because someone has, up to the point of the story, only been straight does not mean that ONE relationship with a person of the same sex makes them gay! It means they’re bisexual, even if it’s just for one guy. There’s nothing wrong with being bisexual. I’m so tired of the bisexual shaming, and I get it from all corners of the spectrum. 


How Loowis Found M/M Romance

Treva Harte, co-owner and Editor-in -Chief, gives a little history of how Loose Id first came to publish m/m romance and her predictions for the future of the genre. Will it go mainstream?

What we got from that first manuscript was the start of a treasure trove of m/m stories. I’ve often said what we received with m/m is a publisher’s dream. There was a whole cornucopia of well-written stories and not many other publishers were picking them up.


What He Says… Where M/M Romance is Headed

Opinion from male writers of m/m about where the genre is heading.

Genre fiction has always been the backbone of publishing, and we as a community are poised to change things for the better. I remember being a teenager and WISHING I could find a gay novel in which no one committed suicide or got the tar beaten out of them.  – Damon Suede


Publishing

A round-up of our most helpful posts.

A link to a post of links… But all very useful ones, from the behind the scenes team at Carina Press. Get the straight dope on how it really works.

I find myself linking back to these posts frequently, and I realized it would be wonderful if we could have a complete round-up of them, so I could link to one post and say “you should read all of this”.


When a Writing Contest Has a Hidden Agenda

Writer’s Beware blog on the red flags to watch out for on writing contests.

…this is because so many contests are a waste of time, with minimal prizes, negligible prestige, and zero cachet on your writing resume.


For Those Who Are About To Rock…

Maisey Yates talks about the fatal flaws that will get a romance sub rejected, and what to do about them.

Hero: I’m the hero, you can tell because I have a broad chest and a chiseled jaw. I also look forbidding.
Editor: I see. What do you do?
Hero: something in Real Estate or something. I’m a billionaire.
Editor: You and every other guy in my stack. What’s your deal?

Three things I notice in 1st 30 seconds of reading a manuscript  by Angela James
Short, but Angela James always has interesting and useful things to say about publishing.

These are three things I notice in the first 30 seconds of reading a manuscript. Three things that usually mean a manuscript is going to have to work that much harder in order to convince me to read past page one


Why publishers fail

A post on the Absolute Write forum about scenarios the mods and old hands at the site have seen many times and why they ask tough questions of start up publishers.

Once you spend much time working with publishers, you realize that the business of publishing is counter-intuitive to the rest of the world. Normal business strategies used in other industries frequently won’t work in publishing, so experience in “running a successful business” seldom applies to becoming a successful publisher. 


Writing

Jane Austen and Gregor Mendel

An odd, yet fascinating blog post about how well the families in Jane Austen novels display an adherence to the inheritence patterns discovered later by Gregor Mendel, the pioneering geneticist (and what that has to do with writing and why it means Austen is even more awesome than you previously realised.)

And MANSFIELD PARK, with its four siblings, is a perfect Mendellian inheritance pattern for sensitivity as a recessive gene (only Edmond, 25% of the offspring, has it).


Featured materials/resources
Writing tips, anecdotes, blog posts and exclusive content provided by writers in residence at The Book Trust. Especially useful stuff from Patrick Ness and funny stuff from Evie Wyld

Your voice

Maisey Yates talks about not letting yourself erase your personal voice from your writing.

It was in that last round of revisions (a half rewrite!) that I threw my hands up and said, “This is it. Go big or go home.” Knowing that I was at Last Chance Point (at least in my mind!) gave me the push to forget about being perfect, and focus on getting intensity, emotion, and real, believable characters onto the page.


25 Lies Writers Tell (And start to believe)

Chuck Wendig on the lies we writers tell ourselves

1. “I don’t have time!”
Said it before, will say it again: I am afforded the same 24 hours that you are. I don’t get 30 hours. Stephen King doesn’t have a magical stopwatch that allows him to operate on Secret Creepy Writer Time. You have a full-time job? So do a lot of writers. Kids? So do a lot of writers. Rampant video-game-playing habit? Sadly, so do a lot of writers. You want time, snatch it from the beast’s mouth. And then use it.


Other

Shelf Candy – Interview with Devil’s Luck Artist Anne Cain
An interview with cover artist Anne Cain, who did the covers for two of my books and many other way bigger names than me!

I’ve been drawing my whole life, and being an artist was one of my earliest dreams as a kid (right after being a paleontologist and crime fighter).


Funny

And to finish on a fun note…

Ed Miliband (not really) reviews 50 Shades of Grey
Hilarious review on Goodreads by Ceilidh

This book, originally published online as Twilight fan-fiction, has angered many in the literary community, especially those who feel that the author exploited fandom and copyrighted material for her own personal gain. The people are angry, Mr Speaker, and since this complacent government won’t take it upon themselves to listen to the will of the people, not the corporations, I decided to read the book myself to see what all the fuss was about. It was… enlightening. 

More links in May. Don’t eat too many Easter Eggs!

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